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    2012

    The series Phlebas are inspired by the mysterious tarot card of Phoenician sailor from T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land.

     

    In the poem the card of the drowned sailor appears as a reminder of a lost civilization and at the same time as a prediction.

     

    What a civilisation leaves behind passing through the flux of time? Its way scarcely represented by remnants – its flotsam and jetsam –  fragmented artefacts only to be later observed or picked up by those who happen to pass by. Phoenician ships have completed their voyages, their cargos scattered and their sailors long since passed away. Museums have salvaged a heap of broken images. We can trace their travel routes from the remains yet their destination is left to our imagination. What if we had a map of their search for a destination? Would it influence our course? It can be after all, that we are on the same ship.

     

    To evoke imagination of possible direction Eliot uses a nonexistent tarot card. In that way the imagination becomes a prediction. However, prediction is not an imagination alone. It grows out of small things – a crucial circumstance or peripheral detail – which nurtured by the imagination becomes reality. This unnoticed sign is represented by a missing tarot card.

     

    These photographs are an exercise in search for such a card. The pictures have been taken on waterways while rushing with the crowds over London’s bridges.